HOTELS| B&Bs| ATTRACTIONS| RESTAURANTS| CASINOS| THEME PARKS| TOURS| WINERIES| SHOPPING| GOLF| WEDDINGS| RECREATION| TICKETS| EVENTS  
  HOTELS| B&Bs| ATTRACTIONS| RESTAURANTS| CASINOS| THEME PARKS| TOURS 
WINERIES| SHOPPING| GOLF| WEDDINGS| RECREATION| TICKETS| EVENTS  
  HOTELS| B&Bs| ATTRACTIONS| RESTAURANTS| WINERIES 
THEME PARKS| TOURS| CASINOS| GOLF| SHOPPING 
WEDDINGS| RECREATION| TICKETS| EVENTS  
  HOTELS| B&Bs| ATTRACTIONS| RESTAURANTS 
WINERIES| THEME PARKS| TOURS 
CASINOS| SHOPPING| GOLF| EVENTS  
WEDDINGS| RECREATION| TICKETS 

Attractions


Ruth Redmond & History of Battle Ground Museum

Ruth Redmond

Ruth Redmond

The property on which the Battle Ground Hotel Museum now sits was donated to the City of Niagara Falls by Miss Ruth Redmond, a local school teacher and long time advocate for the preserving the remaining lands of the Lundy's Lane Battlefield. Her dedication to the beautification of the lands at the crest of Lundy's Lane is a lasting example.

Friends remember the retired school teacher as a "unique Canadian patriot," a quiet gentle woman who surrounded herself with hundreds of geraniums. At the same time she spent much of her life aggressively acquiring as many portions of the historic battlefield as she could afford. She was determined that one day there would be a "tribute to the boys," as she called them, who died during one of the most significant battles in Canadian history.

In the same way that the poppies of Flanders have been associated with Canada's First World War dead, Redmond wanted to associate red geraniums with those who fell at Lundy's Lane.

Redmond was born in 1902 in Holiford, Ontario, a small town north of Kingston. She grew up aware of her United Empire Loyalist roots, but it wasn't until the age of 94 that Redmond received the certificate verifying her ancestors were among Ontario's early European settlers who had tried to defend Britain during the American Revolution. Redmond and her sister Norma Fiddes, both received their U.E. designation in 1996. (The Review, April 6, 1999)

A high school teacher at Stamford Collegiate for 41 years, Redmond purchased six properties, including Fralick's Tavern, a circa 1830's watering hole adjacent to the historic site, and deeded them to the city several years ago.

Without her efforts, those parts of the original battlefield might have ended up in the hands of developers, local preservationists say.

Redmond graduated from Queen's University in 1923. She attended the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education in Toronto in 1924 to acquire her teaching degree.

In 1926, she followed her older sister, Mildred, a Thorold teacher, to Niagara and was hired by Stamford to teach English and history. She retired in 1967. (The Review, April 6, 1999)

"She chose the geranium to be her personal battlefield flower" said City Councillor Janice Wing, a friend and fellow United Empire Loyalist. This was her memorial to "the boys" as she called them.

Ruth Redmond was always shy about being given credit for what she did, and never sought out publicity or honours, but was always gracious when they came her way. Generations of Canadians will know their history a little better because of the effort she put into assembling the lands for the battlefield memorial park. (The Review, April 7, 1999)

Redmond earned a bachelor of Arts degree in English and history from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, in 1923 and then graduated from teacher's college in Toronto. She taught at two Eastern Ontario high schools before coming to Niagara Falls.

But the majority of her teaching career - from 1926-1967 - was spent at Stamford Collegiate.

Once she retired from teaching, gardening became nearly a full-time hobby, earning her 10 summer trillium awards, the City's prize for outstanding horticultural displays. (The Review, April 6, 1999)

The "real stuff" includes a stone marker allegedly placed by the Americans to mark territory claimed before they were pushed back by Canadian forces. It's tucked in one of the lovingly tended flower beds, amidst the shelter of 200-odd evergreens Redmond planted decades ago in her "Shangri-La". The Review, Aug. 27, 1994)

Redmond's fight began in 1954 when she cashed in her Bell telephone shares and purchased her first home.

"I got the house and was so happy," said Redmond, a former teacher at Stamford Collegiate. "Maybe no one else would like the house, but I love it. This is the only place I could ever live."

With that acquisition Redmond began forming a mini-realm. Soon after, she purchased four nearby houses and a plot of land adjacent to her home. The purchase prevented the circa 1831 Fralick's Inn from being razed to make way for a motel.

"If I could just live to be 200. I'm sure I could make people realize the importance of preserving where they come from." (The St. Catharines Standard, Nov. 30, 1995)

      - Drummond Hill Cemetery
      - The Battle of Lundy's Lane
      - Site History

Niagara Helicopters